***PHOTO ADVISORY*** Sen. Jones takes ‘Polar Plunge’

***PHOTO ADVISORY***

Sen. Jones takes ‘Polar Plunge’

Lansing— State Sen. Rick Jones, R-Grand Ledge, vaults into an ice-cold pool in front of the Capitol on Thursday. Jones and other legislators participated in the Legislative Polar Plunge” in order to raise money for the Special Olympics.  Jones is a board member of the Special Olympics Michigan Committee and has been a volunteer at the summer games for many years.  In total $30,000 was raised for Special Olympics athletes. Jones was the only senator to take the plunge, while others contributed to the fund. Lt. Gov. Brian Calley and members of the Michigan House also participated in the event.

Jones law used to determine custody

Jones law used to determine custody

LANSING—A Fenton father was granted custody of his biological daughter on Monday, a situation that was made possible as a result of legislation sponsored by Sen. Rick Jones.
“It took a few years, but all of the hard work of Sen. Steve Bieda and me was validated today,” said Jones, R-Grand Ledge.

Public Acts 160-162 of 2012 allow possible biological fathers to file a petition to determine paternity under certain circumstances.  Prior to these laws being enacted, state law did not give a possible biological father legal standing to file a paternity action to show he may be the biological father of a child born to a married woman.
The laws sponsored by Jones,  allow biological fathers to claim parental rights within a year of their child’s birth if the mother is married at any time from conception to the birth of a child and her husband denies paternity, or if a relationship is established between the biological father and the child. The measure also gives judges the ability to rule what is best for the child on a case-by-case basis.

Bieda and Jones both agreed that the archaic law needed to be updated to allow for common sense, technological advances, and most importantly, the welfare of the child to all be factors when deciding what is best for the child.

According to Jones, the measure was introduced following the tragic story of Fenton father, Daniel Quinn, who has been fighting to obtain parental rights of his child.

Prior to these bills being signed into law, Quinn, the biological father, had no rights under Michigan law to gain custody of his child.

“I was extremely happy to see this father and child reunited,” Jones said. “I know this updated Paternity Act will help empower parents to seek a relationship with their children in the future.” 

Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police names Jones Legislator of the Year

Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police names Jones Legislator of the Year

LANSING— State Sen. Rick Jones recently received the Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police Legislator of the Year Award.

“I was honored to receive this award from such a distinguished group,” said Jones, R-Grand Ledge. “I will continue to work hard with my colleagues in the Legislature to make Michigan a safer place to live, work and vacation.” 

Sen. Jones pleased with Michigan Supreme Court ruling on medical marijuana dispensaries

Sen. Jones pleased with Michigan Supreme Court ruling on medical marijuana dispensaries

LANSING— The Michigan Supreme Court ruled on Friday that individuals with a medical marijuana card must get their medical marijuana from a registered caregiver.

Sen Jones offered the following statement:

“The original intent of this was to provide medical marijuana to the very ill, not to have dispensaries opening up across Michigan. People were concerned that dispensaries were being opened close to schools and churches where rehabilitation meetings were being held.

“Hopefully this ruling by the court will put an end to this debate and the practice of selling marijuana over the counter like it is a common, everyday item.”

 

Jones wants sex offenders to maintain state registry

Jones wants sex offenders to maintain state registry

LANSING— State Sen. Rick Jones is working on drafting legislation that would require registered sex offenders to pay an annual to help maintain the state’s sex offender registry.

“Indiana charges $50 per year; Illinois and Ohio charge $100 per year,” said Jones R-Grand Ledge.  “Sex offenders can afford to pay a dollar or two per week to pay for the list. The tax payers should not have to be burdened with this cost. The offenders should support this list as they do in neighboring states.”

Currently, the cost of maintaining the Sex Offender Registry database is funded through a one-time $50 registration fee, even though the majority of offenders register for 25 years to life. During the past five years, the money collected from this one-time fee is less than 10 percent of the cost of maintaining the registry.

Jones noted that as a result, law enforcement must divert taxpayer dollars that should be spent on putting more police officers on the streets.

“This is a common sense initiative that surrounding states already have in place,” Jones added.
 

####