Sen. Jones’ cyber revenge bill signed into law

Sen. Rick Jones

Sen. Rick Jones

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Rick Jones’ bill to criminalize “cyber revenge” in Michigan has been signed into law.

Cyber revenge, also known as revenge porn, is the posting of sexually explicit images on the Internet without the consent of an individual, but it also includes images given through consent within the confines of a private relationship.

“It is unfortunate that some people use the power of the Internet to destroy someone’s life or take out revenge on a former lover,” said Jones, R-Grand Ledge. “Abusing today’s great technological advancements, offenders of cyber revenge only need a moment to put a sexually explicit photo online without consent — for the purpose of intimidating or harassing the victim or to simply ruin their reputation. Now, it’s a crime and will be punished.”

Jones partnered with Sen. Steven Bieda, D-Warren, on the bipartisan measures to make it illegal in Michigan to intentionally disseminate any sexually explicit visual material of another person without the consent of the individual.

Under Senate Bills 508 and 509, now Public Acts 89 and 90 of 2016, first-time offenders would be guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by up to 93 days in jail, a fine of $500, or both. Subsequent violations could result in one year in prison, a $1,000 fine, or both.

“With these new laws, Michigan is taking a stand on behalf of these victims,” Jones said. “Everyone deserves to have their privacy protected — especially in their own home. Cyber revenge will not be tolerated in our great state.”

To learn more about cyber revenge, visit the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative website at www.endrevengeporn.org.

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**PHOTO ADVISORY** Sen. Jones welcomes Pastor Berry to lead the Senate invocation

LANSING, Mich. Sen. Rick Jones, R-Grand Ledge, proudly welcomed Pastor Kevin Berry (right) to the Michigan Senate on Thursday. Berry serves as pastor at Mount Hope Church in Delta Township and delivered the invocation before the start of Senate session.

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Editor’s note: The above photograph of Jones with Berry is available by clicking on the image or by visiting the senator’s website at www.SenatorRickJones.com. Click on “Photowire.”

House panel approves Jones’ foster children bill

Sen. Rick Jones

Sen. Rick Jones

LANSING, Mich. — The House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday unanimously approved legislation sponsored by Sen. Rick Jones to help ensure the best care and placement for foster children.

“I have seen some of the awful situations many young children endure, and I have also seen the strength that children possess to make it through hard times,” said Jones, R-Grand Ledge. “As a foster grandparent, I know the positive impact of keeping siblings together. A bond between siblings is one of the most cherished parts of a family.”

Senate Bill 483 would put a greater emphasis on sibling placement and visitation with siblings. If siblings could not be placed together, then a priority of sibling visitations and ongoing interaction would be arranged to ensure a sibling bond.

The bill would require frequent visitations between non-custodial, biological parents and their children unless the court determines that the parenting time would be harmful to the child.

“As long as there is no harm to a foster child seeing their biological parent, they should be able to spend time together and preserve their family bond,” Jones said.

Jones said that the University of Michigan Law School Legislation Clinic brought this issue to his attention.

“I have been working with them, the Children’s Law Section Council and the state Department of Health and Human Services to make sure that we are helping our foster children,” Jones said. “I thank the committee for moving this legislation and look forward to the House approving it.”

SB 483 now heads to the full House of Representatives for consideration.

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Jones bill to stop ‘cyber revenge’ heading to the governor

Sen. Rick Jones

Sen. Rick Jones

LANSING, Mich. — Legislation sponsored by Sen. Rick Jones to criminalize “cyber revenge” in Michigan is on its way to the governor’s desk.

Cyber revenge, also known as revenge porn, is the posting of sexually explicit images on the Internet without the consent of an individual, but also includes images given through consent within the confines of a private relationship.

“Cyber revenge isn’t about art or speech or even sex — it’s about using the power of the Internet to destroy someone’s life,” said Jones, R-Grand Ledge. “We live in a time of great technological advancements. Unfortunately, it only takes a second put a sexually explicit photo online without consent — for the purpose of intimidating or harassing the victim or to simply ruin their reputation.”

Jones partnered with Sen. Steven Bieda, D-Warren, on the bipartisan legislation, which would make it illegal in Michigan to intentionally disseminate any sexually explicit visual material of another person without the consent of the individual.

Under Senate Bills 508 and 509, first-time offenders would be guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by up to 93 days in jail, a fine of $500, or both. Subsequent violations could result in one year in prison, a $1,000 fine, or both.

“Everyone deserves to have their privacy protected — especially in their own home,” Jones said. “With these bills, we are taking a stand on behalf of these victims that cyber revenge will not be tolerated in the state of Michigan and providing authorities with tools to help stop the crime and prosecute the oppressors.”

To learn more about cyber revenge, visit the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative website at www.endrevengeporn.org.

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Jones introduces bill to protect the Great Lakes

Sen. Rick Jones

Sen. Rick Jones

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Rick Jones on Wednesday formally introduced legislation that aims to shut down oil pipelines in the Great Lakes.

Jones’ measure, Senate Bill 880, would aim to target Line 5, a 62-year-old pipeline owned by Enbridge, and stop the flow of crude oil from Alberta, Canada under the Straits of Mackinac to the Canadian Sarnia refinery in Ontario.

“This is about securing the safety of our Pure Michigan waters,” said Jones, R-Grand Ledge. “There are 40 million people drinking water from the Great Lakes and they can’t drink Canadian oil. Canada is simply using Michigan as a shortcut to get to Sarnia.”

Enbridge’s Line 6B was the pipeline that caused the Kalamazoo River oil spill in 2010. This was one of the worst and most expensive oil spills in U.S. history. Line 6B was an aged pipeline that was built the 1960s, much like Line 5.

“I do not believe that it is a question of if the line fails, but when,” Jones said. “There are two pipelines under the straits, so that puts us at twice the risk for a disastrous oil leak — which would devastate the state’s tourism industry and wreak havoc on the health of the world’s largest collection of fresh water.”

SB 880 would amend the Great Lakes Submerged Lands Act to stop future pipelines from running through the Great Lakes. It would also require operators of current oil pipelines to undergo a full risk analysis by a qualified independent third party and turn it into the state. If the preliminary analysis concludes that risks are high, the pipeline would be shut down immediately.

“I fully believe that Line 5 will be determined to be too high of a risk after the analysis, and the pipeline will be forced to be decommissioned under the straits,” Jones said. “Under the Michigan Constitution it is my duty as senator to protect our greatest natural resource, the Great Lakes, and I intend to do so.”

Jones’ bill has been referred to the Senate Energy and Technology Committee for consideration.

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Jones introduces bill to shut down oil pipeline in the Great Lakes

Sen. Rick Jones

Sen. Rick Jones

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Rick Jones plans to introduce legislation this week that aims to shut down oil pipelines in the Great Lakes.

Jones’ legislation would aim to target Line 5, a 62-year-old pipeline owned by Enbridge, and stop the flow of crude oil from Alberta, Canada under the Straits of Mackinac to the Canadian Sarnia refinery in Ontario.

“This is about securing the safety of our Pure Michigan waters,” said Jones, R-Grand Ledge. “There are 40 million people drinking water from the Great Lakes and they can’t drink Canadian oil. Canada is simply using Michigan as a shortcut to get to Sarnia.”

Enbridge’s Line 6B was the pipeline that caused the Kalamazoo River oil spill in 2010. This was one of the worst and most expensive oil spills in U.S. history. Line 6B was an aged pipeline that was built the 1960s, much like Line 5.

“I do not believe that it is a question of if the line fails, but when,” Jones said. “There are two pipelines under the straits, so that puts us at twice the risk for a disastrous oil leak — which would devastate the state’s tourism industry and wreak havoc on the health of the world’s largest collection of fresh water.”

The upcoming legislation would amend the Great Lakes Submerged Lands Act to stop future pipelines from running through the Great Lakes. It would also require operators of current oil pipelines to undergo a full risk analysis by a qualified independent third party and turn it into the state. If the preliminary analysis concludes that risks are high, the pipeline would be shut down immediately.

“I fully believe that Line 5 will be determined to be too high of a risk after the analysis, and the pipeline will be forced to be decommissioned under the straits,” Jones said. “Under the Michigan Constitution it is my duty as senator to protect our greatest natural resource, the Great Lakes, and I intend to do so.”

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