**PHOTO ADVISORY** Jones sets up Nativity scene on Capitol lawn

LANSING, Mich. Sen. Rick Jones, R-Grand Ledge, set up a Nativity scene on the east lawn of the Michigan Capitol on Thursday morning. Jones encourages the public to come out to see the display. He will make the trip to the Capitol every day through Dec. 20 to put up the Nativity scene in the morning and then dismantle it each night by 9 p.m., in accordance with Capitol Commission rules.

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Editor’s note: The photographs are available by clicking on the images or by visiting www.SenatorRickJones.com/Photowire.

**MEDIA ADVISORY** Jones to set up Nativity scene at Capitol on Thursday morning

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Rick Jones will be setting up a Nativity scene on Thursday morning on the east lawn of the Michigan Capitol. Jones encourages the public to come out to see the display, which will be set up each day through Dec. 20.

Who:
Sen. Rick Jones, R-Grand Ledge, and
Local residents.

What:
Jones will be putting up a Nativity scene on the Capitol lawn.

When:
Thursday, Dec. 14 at 9:30 a.m.

Where:
Michigan State Capitol
East Lawn (south side)
Lansing

Brief:
Jones will make the trip to the Capitol every day through Dec. 20 to put up the Nativity scene in the morning and then dismantle it each night by 9 p.m., in accordance with Capitol Commission rules.

This will be the fourth year that Jones has set up and taken down the Nativity each day leading up to Christmas. Jones says he does it as a citizen looking to help celebrate the true spirit of Christmas.

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Senate approves Jones bill concerning traffic light outages

LANSING, Mich. — The Michigan Senate on Wednesday unanimously approved Sen. Rick Jones’ legislation to provide clarity to drivers on what to do at an intersection when the traffic light goes out.

“Even though most drivers are taught that an intersection with a nonworking traffic signal becomes a four-way stop, that is not true in Michigan,” said Jones, R-Grand Ledge. “People need to know exactly what to do if a traffic light is out. This legislation will remove the confusion from the current law and ensure that all Michigan drivers are on the same page.”

Senate Bill 521 would require drivers to treat intersections where a traffic signal is malfunctioning as a four-way stop. The bill would not apply to traffic lights that are only active during certain periods, such as signals outside of a school or a fire department.

“Winter weather will soon be here, and Michigan families deserve roads that are as safe as possible — especially during power outages after a storm,” Jones said. “If one driver thinks it’s a four-way stop and another driver thinks he has the right-of-way, that’s a recipe for disaster. Treating all intersections as four-way stops if the signal is out might slow traffic a bit on major roads, but it’s worth it if it can help save lives.”

The Michigan State Police support the bill, which now heads to the House of Representatives for consideration.

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**PHOTO ADVISORY** Sen. Jones joins American Legion state public relations director in support of veterans club bill

LANSING, Mich. Sen. Rick Jones, R-Grand Ledge, and Mark Sutton, public relations director for the American Legion Department of Michigan, on Wednesday outlined the need to enact legislation that would allow veterans clubs like the American Legion or Veterans of Foreign Wars to sell beer to members of different chapters of the same organization.

Senate Bill 662 would allow a local club of a nonprofit veterans or fraternal organization that is currently allowed to sell alcohol to its members to be able to serve alcohol to members of different branches or chapters of the same organization from across the state.

After hearing from Jones and Sutton, the Senate Regulatory Reform Committee unanimously approved the bill.

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Editor’s note: The above photograph of Jones is available by clicking on the image or by visiting the senator’s website at www.SenatorRickJones.com/Photowire.

Senate panel OKs Jones bill to clarify veterans club law

Sen. Rick Jones

Sen. Rick Jones

LANSING, Mich. — The Senate Regulatory Reform Committee on Wednesday approved Sen. Rick Jones’ legislation that would allow a veterans club to sell beer to members of different chapters of the same organization.

The Liquor Control Commission (LCC) recently told a Veterans of Foreign Wars club that they could not sell beer to visiting members from other VFW clubs.

For decades, the American Legion, VFW, Eagles, Moose, and Knights of Columbus clubs allowed visiting members of another club within the same organization purchase a beer. The LCC had been interpreting the law differently than current club practices.

“This legislation will ensure that Michigan veterans can visit nonprofit veterans clubs across the state, purchase a beer and spend time with those who have served our nation,” said Jones, R-Grand Ledge. “Our veterans have made tremendous sacrifices for our nation. At the very least, they have earned the ability to visit a fellow veteran in another town and to order a beer at their veterans club.”

Senate Bill 662 would allow a local club of a nonprofit veterans or fraternal organization that is currently allowed to sell alcohol to its members to be able serve alcohol to members of different branches or chapters from across the state of the same organization. The bill has 33 co-sponsors.

Similar legislation has been introduced in the Michigan House by Rep. Tom Barrett, R-Potterville, who is an Iraq War veteran.

SB 662 now heads to the full Senate for consideration.

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Jones’ police academy background check bill headed to governor

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Rick Jones’ legislation to allow criminal background checks on police training academy applicants is on its way to the governor.

“This is part of a continued effort to keep our communities safe by doing everything we can to ensure Michigan has the best men and women protecting and serving our families,” said Jones, R-Grand Ledge. “I look forward to seeing the governor sign this important legislation and make sure that no prospective police officer in our state has a violent criminal past.”

The Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards (MCOLES) currently does not have authority to gain information from the Michigan State Police (MSP) on fingerprints submitted for a criminal history record information check by persons wanting to enter a preservice college basic law enforcement training academy or a regional basic law enforcement training academy.

Senate Bill 524 would allow MCOLES to have the MSP conduct fingerprint background checks of applicants to law enforcement training academies through the MSP system and through the FBI.

“The only way to know whether or not police academy applicants have criminal records is to do full background checks,” said Jones, a former Eaton County sheriff. “I was shocked that our police training academies were not already doing these critical checks. Without these reviews, it’s possible that our academies could be providing firearms training to criminals.”

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